My Blog

Posts for: May, 2021

By John P. Ducar, DDS, Inc
May 23, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
GumDiseaseCouldImpactMoreThanYourOralHealth

Preventing periodontal (gum) disease not only preserves your teeth and gums, it might also benefit the rest of your health. There's growing evidence that gum disease has links to other systemic diseases.

Gum disease usually starts with dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles, which triggers a bacterial gum infection. Left untreated, the infection advances and steadily breaks down the gums' attachment to teeth.

This can create large ulcerated areas that are too weak to prevent the passing of bacteria and toxins into the bloodstream and other parts of the body. There's growing evidence from epidemiology (the study of the spread and control of disease) that this bloodstream transfer, as well as the inflammation that accompanies gum disease, could affect other body-wide conditions or diseases.

Diabetes. This chronic condition occurs when the body can't adequately produce insulin, a hormone that regulates sugar (glucose) in the blood, or can't respond to it. Diabetes can inhibit healing, cause blindness or lead to death. Both diabetes and gum disease are inflammatory in nature, and there's some evidence inflammation arising from either condition may worsen the other.

Heart disease. Heart attack, congestive heart failure, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases are a leading cause of death. Like diabetes and gum disease, these heart-related conditions are also characterized by inflammation. There are also specific types of bacteria that arise from gum disease that can travel through the body and increase the risk of heart disease.

Arthritis. An autoimmune disease, rheumatoid arthritis causes debilitating pain, particularly involving the joints, and leads to decreased mobility. Interestingly, many newly diagnosed arthritis patients are also found to have some form of periodontal disease—the two diseases, in fact, follow a similar development track. Although this may hint of a connection, we need more research to determine if there are indeed links between the two diseases.

Regardless of any direct relationships between gum disease and other conditions, preventing and treating it can improve both your oral and general health. You can lower your risk of gum disease by practicing daily brushing and flossing and undergoing regular dental cleanings to remove plaque. And at the first sign of gum problems, see your dentist as soon as possible for early intervention—the earlier the better.

If you would like more information on oral health care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Good Oral Health Leads to Better Health Overall.”


WisdomTeethCanStillbeaProblemfortheWorldsYoungestBillionaire

According to Forbes Magazine, Kylie Jenner is the world's youngest billionaire at age 22. Daughter of Caitlyn (Bruce) Jenner and Kris Jenner, Kylie is the founder and owner of the highly successful Kylie Cosmetics, and a rising celebrity in her own right. But even this busy CEO couldn't avoid an experience many young people her age go through each year: having her wisdom teeth removed.

At around 10 million removals each year, wisdom teeth extraction is the most common surgical procedure performed by oral surgeons. Also called the third molars, the wisdom teeth are in the back corners of the jaws, top and bottom. Most people have four of them, but some have more, some have fewer, and some never have any. They're typically the last permanent teeth to come in, usually between ages 17 and 25.

And therein lies the problem with wisdom teeth: Many times, they're coming in late on a jaw already crowded with teeth. Their eruption can cause these other teeth to move out of normal alignment, or the wisdom teeth themselves may not fully erupt and remain fully or partially within the gums (a condition called impaction). All of this can have a ripple effect, decreasing dental function and increasing disease risk.

As Kylie Jenner has just experienced, they're often removed when problems with bite or instances of diseases like tooth decay or gum disease begin to show. But not just when problems show: It's also been a common practice to remove them earlier in a kind of “preemptive strike” against dental dysfunction. But this practice of early wisdom teeth extraction has its critics. The main contention is that early extractions aren't really necessary from a medical or dental standpoint, and so patients are unduly exposed to surgical risks. Although negative outcomes are very rare, any surgical procedure carries some risk.

Over the last few years, a kind of middle ground consensus has developed among dentists on how to deal with wisdom teeth in younger patients. What has emerged is a “watch and wait” approach: Don't advise extraction unless there is clear evidence of developing problems. Instead, continue to monitor a young patient's dental development to see that it's progressing normally.

Taking this approach can lead to fewer early wisdom teeth extractions, which are postponed to a later time or even indefinitely. The key is to always do what's best for a patient's current development and future dental health.

Still, removing wisdom teeth remains a sound practice when necessary. Whether for a high school or college student or the CEO of a large company, wisdom teeth extraction can boost overall dental health and development.

If you would like more information about wisdom teeth and their impact on dental health, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Wisdom Teeth: To Be or Not to Be?


By John P. Ducar, DDS, Inc
May 03, 2021
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implant  
4ReasonsDentalImplantsAreaWiseChoiceforToothReplacement

You've lost some teeth, and now you have to decide how to replace them. A fixed bridge or a partial denture are certainly good options. But the best choice today that dentistry has to offer is dental implants.

Implants have exploded in popularity among both dentists and patients, offering exceptional quality in life-likeness and durability. But they do have one drawback that might cause you to hesitate in choosing them: They're usually more expensive than other common tooth replacement systems, even more so if you're replacing each individual missing tooth with an implant.

But before you pass on them for something more affordable, take another look at dental implants. Here are 4 reasons why implants could be the wiser option for tooth replacement.

Life-like and functional. Other restorations can effectively mimic the appearance of real teeth, and they're reasonably functional. But implants score at the top in both categories because they replace more of the tooth—not just the crown, but the tooth root as well.

Bone friendly. Other restorations can't stop the gradual bone loss often caused by missing teeth, and dentures in particular can accelerate it. But implants are made of titanium, a bio-compatible metal that's also bone-friendly—bone cells readily grow and adhere to its surface. This accumulated growth around the implant site helps slow or stop bone loss.

Long-term savings. The integration of bone and implant creates a durable hold that can last for several years, possibly outlasting other restorations in the same situation. Taking into account all the costs—installation, maintenance and possible replacement—that can occur over the life of a restoration, implants could actually cost less in the long run.

Versatile. Implants can be used for more than single tooth replacements—they can be incorporated with other restorations like bridges or dentures to provide better support. Marrying implants with traditional tooth replacement systems can be less costly than implants individually while enhancing benefits like durability and bone strength.

Dental implants may not be right for everyone, particularly those who've experienced advanced bone loss. But if a thorough dental exam shows you're a good candidate, dental implants could be well worth the investment in your health and appearance.

If you would like more information on dental implant restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implants: Your Best Option for Replacing Teeth.”